Saturday, July 1, 2017

My Eyes Hurt

Backwood Babies by R.P. Healy makes me think the author probably strokes quite a few out to movies like Wrong Turn, not because of Eliza Dushku, but because the inbred mutants get Healy all hot and bothered...or maybe a movie like I Spit On Your Grave. I have read all kinds of trash, but this has some seriously limited vocabulary describing some very basic torture fantasy. Even if I didn't find the entire story offensive, the writing is simply atrocious. No plot at all.

As always,
AstraDaemon

Friday, June 30, 2017

Watch Your Back

Happy Hour by Andrew Ridings is a somewhat brutal flash fiction piece about an evening at the bar gone wrong. I didn't feel much sympathy for the main character, Anderson, so I was a little disappointed with the ending. The bartender is pretty awesome though.

As always,
AstraDaemon

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Throwback Thursday: Mr. Pinkerton

How I Started The Apocalypse by Brian Pinkerton was far more serious than I expected. In fact, I most likely would not have read a book with this title and cover art (based on the cheese factor), but I’m a big fan of Severed Press, so I gave it a chance.
Having read several other zombie novels featuring thinking undead, I didn’t have a problem with the main character being an intelligent zombie – I was curious how it would tie in with the title, and ended up reading it in one sitting. I thought his POV was pretty interesting, considering he had memories of his former life as well as his demise, so his struggle with reanimation was an unusual twist on the theme of self-discovery.
I especially liked the extra storyline running parallel to the main plot: not only do you have a guy endeavouring to accept that he is a zombie, but he finds out his death wasn’t an accident, and he wants revenge.
I did think some of the characters were a bit unrealistic, but they didn’t ruin the story for me, and I liked the rotating POV between the zombie and the agent hunting him.
(I’m intentionally being vague in this review because I don’t want to post spoilers.) I’m assuming the book is intended to be a stand-alone, but the ending was kind of teaser that had me wondering if the author was leaving his options open...turns out that Pinkerton did turn this into a zombie trilogy.
If you’re looking for something a bit different for your zombie lit collection, I recommend this one.
As always,
AstraDaemon

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Prom Isn't Worth Your Soul

The Shopkeep by Zach Miller is a short story with a neat-o nod to Stephen King. I thought I was going to dislike the story because I couldn't stand the banter between the characters and I found the setup to be on the lame side. HOWEVER, the monsters are frightening and the ending left me wanting more. I think Zach Miller is a freaking tease for writing such a terrifying concept and using it in a short story instead of a full-length novel.

As always,
AstraDaemon

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Front Desk Service

Hotel Z by A.C. Hutchinson is an unusual zombie story, and I don't think I've ever read anything quite like it. I have come across a few characters with a similar fetish, but Hutchinson is the first author that I've seen embrace the sickness and run with it. The ending is very tongue-in-cheek...I guess depravity knows no bounds. If the author wanted to expand on the concept of the hotel, I think he has an entertaining novel waiting to be written.

As always,
AstraDaemon

Monday, June 26, 2017

Scary Stuff

You Are Just A Guest by James T Kelly scared the crap out of me. I made the mistake of reading this story late at night, during a thunderstorm. The format is spectacular: the wife blogs, the husband tweets, and, through both, readers learn what is happening inside the old house. The ending is truly frightening. I would love for the author to do a follow-up short story from the POV of one of the friends.

As always,
AstraDaemon

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Stranger Danger

Thanks For The Lift by Donna Dillon is a fantastic horror story that is perfect for an evening campfire. I had no idea what form the terror would take, which kept me hooked from beginning to end. The fact that the story centers around two young brothers increases the ill-feelings tenfold. I can't get over how many emotions Dillon is able to stir with just a few pages. I hope she keeps writing in this genre.

As always,
AstraDaemon